Three Questions for Hamas

Global Justice in the 21st Century

 

There is no doubt that Hamas has exhibited extraordinary resilience under the most difficult of conditions that have bedeviled its period of political leadership in the Gaza Strip that started in 2007. It also seems clear as persuasively argued by Sandy Tolan in a valuable Common Dreams article [Tolan, “Blown Chances in Gaza: Israel & U.S. Miss Many Chances to Avoid War, Aug. 13, 2014] that Hamas pursued multiple initiatives starting in 2006 designed to achieve calm and quiet in its relations with Israel, and that these initiatives, including back channel reassurance about peaceful intentions, were rebuffed without even being acknowledged by either Israel or the United States. It also seems the case that Israel acted to provoke the three most sustained military onslaughts directed at Gaza since 2008, and in each has relied on disproportionate force, inflicted numerous civilian casualties, and acted in a manner defiant of international…

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1 thought on “Three Questions for Hamas

  1. Below is the comment by British Jewish writer and blogger, Paul Eisen.

    First, in my view, it’s fine that Hamas don’t seem to much care if they’re accepted as ‘a legitimate political actor’, so long as they’re accepted as ‘a legitimate political resistor’.

    Second, much of Hamas’ resistance lies precisely in their abandonment of strategy. Who cares ‘if-we-do-this-will-they-do-that’, whatever the Palestinians do the Israelis will try to eliminate them.

    And who cares about the tone of their Charter? The Hamas Charter is about resistance, so what does it matter what the Israelis and the rest of the grovelling world think? And by the way, if Hamas uses the J-word for those slaughtering their children, then that’s just about right. And if Hamas calls for the elimination of the Israeli state (not the people), that’s fine by me.

    And as far as the recent summary execution of collaborators which Falk finds so objectionable – well, my understanding is that the Jews in the Warsaw Ghetto did much the same. Would Falk like to condemn that as well?

    I’m afraid Richard Falk has fallen into the trap of so many of those Jewish sages to whom the Palestinian people are so indebted. He presides over the discourse, allocating moral brownie-points to all and sundry – but fails to see who is the perpetrator and who is the victim.

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